The Journal of Plastination

Published in J. Int. Soc. Plast. 8 (1): 11 (1994)

Procedure Update: Recycling Used Acetone In Plastination Laboratories

AUTHORS:
Giles Grondin
affiliations:

Universite' du Quebec A Tros-Rivieres, Canada

ABSTRACT:

Last year, we published a technique for recycling acetone in plastination laboratories (Grondin and Berube, 1992). Our method includes three steps: The first step is called "freeze-separation" which consists of leaving the used acetone at -20°C overnight and then filtering it through cheese cloth. This step is very efficient in removing fat from the contaminated acetone. The second step, called "vacuum distillation", uses the standard equipment (vacuum pump, freezer, manometer) found in a plastination laboratory and produces an acetone that is 97% pure. The third step, called "physical water extraction", is achieved by adding to the distilled acetone a desiccant that will extract the residual water and bring the purity to 99%. The molecular sieves (Fisher Scientific, Cat. No. M518-5LB) are used for filtration which eliminates the light yellow coloration of the acetone.

In our original publication (Grondin and Berube, 1992), the second step did not provide precise information on the pressure requirements in the vacuum system during the distillation process. This was due to the fact that we did not have an adequate pressure gauge to monitor the pressure. The manometer used was a Bennert Manometer which does not register a pressure reading high enough to meet the requirement for the procedure. But, as a result of the money saved on acetone disposal we were able to purchase a vacuum gauge which precisely measures the pressure during the distillation. In beginning any exacting procedure, good reliable equipment must be used, and not simply trying to save money just to start up.

 

KEY WORDS:

freeze separation; molecular sieves; vacuum system

*CORRESPONDENCE TO:

Giles Grondin, Universite' du Quebec A Tros-R,vieres, Canada

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Article Statistics

Volume: 8
Issue: 1
Allocation-id: 0000

Submitted Date:May 27, 1994
Accepted Date: June 17, 1994
Published Date: July 20, 1994

DOI Information:       https://doi.org/10.56507/RPDH7642

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Article Citation

The Journal of Plastination (May 21, 2024) Procedure Update: Recycling Used Acetone In Plastination Laboratories. Retrieved from https://journal.plastination.org/articles/procedure-update-recycling-used-acetone-in-plastination-laboratories/.
"Procedure Update: Recycling Used Acetone In Plastination Laboratories." The Journal of Plastination - May 21, 2024, https://journal.plastination.org/articles/procedure-update-recycling-used-acetone-in-plastination-laboratories/
The Journal of Plastination - Procedure Update: Recycling Used Acetone In Plastination Laboratories. [Internet]. [Accessed May 21, 2024]. Available from: https://journal.plastination.org/articles/procedure-update-recycling-used-acetone-in-plastination-laboratories/
"Procedure Update: Recycling Used Acetone In Plastination Laboratories." The Journal of Plastination [Online]. Available: https://journal.plastination.org/articles/procedure-update-recycling-used-acetone-in-plastination-laboratories/. [Accessed: May 21, 2024]

INTRODUCTION

Last year, we published a technique for recycling acetone in plastination laboratories (Grondin and Berube, 1992). Our method includes three steps: The first step is called "freeze-separation" which consists of leaving the used acetone at -20°C overnight and then filtering it through cheese cloth. This step is very efficient in removing fat from the contaminated acetone. The second step, called "vacuum distillation", uses the standard equipment (vacuum pump, freezer, manometer) found in a plastination laboratory and produces an acetone that is 97% pure. The third step, called "physical water extraction", is achieved by adding to the distilled acetone a desiccant that will extract the residual water and bring the purity to 99%. The molecular sieves (Fisher Scientific, Cat. No. M518-5LB) are used for filtration which eliminates the light yellow coloration of the acetone.

In our original publication (Grondin and Berube, 1992), the second step did not provide precise information on the pressure requirements in the vacuum system during the distillation process. This was due to the fact that we did not have an adequate pressure gauge to monitor the pressure. The manometer used was a Bennert Manometer which does not register a pressure reading high enough to meet the requirement for the procedure. But, as a result of the money saved on acetone disposal we were able to purchase a vacuum gauge which precisely measures the pressure during the distillation. In beginning any exacting procedure, good reliable equipment must be used, and not simply trying to save money just to start up.

REFERENCES

Grondin, Giles G, S. Berube: A simple and Inexpensive Method for Recycling Used Acetone; J. Int. Soc. Plastination. 6 (1): 17-19, 1992 https://doi.org/10.56507/VRMT8219

Online ISSN: 2311-777X
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